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97 AMW in Photos: assembling mobility aircrew training

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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alexander Fickas, an aerial delivery specialist assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, lowers an overhead crane to raise a heavy platform, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. They raise the heavy platform to straighten the suspension lines so they can tie tubular nylon into the “deadman” configuration. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

From left, U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Devin Johnson and Senior Airman Dylan Norton, aerial delivery specialists assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, tie tubular nylon around a suspension line, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The tubular nylon around the suspensions is called the “deadman” configuration, which keeps the platform centered underneath the parachute after deployment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Devin Johnson, an aerial delivery specialist assigned tothe 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, cuts off the excess portion of a knot, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. Two inches of excess tubular nylon are kept and taped to prevent slippage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

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U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Noah Weston, an aerial delivery specialist assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, folds the excess suspension line before tying it down, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The folded suspension line allows condensed storage while in the aircraft and proper stabilization when the platform is dropped. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

Aerial delivery specialists assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron assemblea pallet used for aircrew training, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. In total, it takes around 12 members to assemble a single platform, who work together to assemble 10 to 25 platforms a week. Before assembling the platform, parachutes have to be packed: three different types drogue, G-12, and extraction. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

From left, U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Devin Johnson, Senior Airman Alexander Fickas and Airman 1st Class Noah Weston, aerial delivery specialists assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, tighten type-V straps attached to the platform to secure G-12E parachutes, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The type-V straps are cut during platform aerial drop deployment allowing the parachutes to unravel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dylan Norton and Airman 1st Class Noah Weston, aerial delivery specialists assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, carry a G-12E parachute to be attached to a heavy platform, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The G-12E is the main parachute that stabilizes and slows the descent of the platform to ensure safe transportation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Devin Johnson, an aerial delivery specialist assigned tothe 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, ties tubular nylon to G-12E parachutes, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. This connection allows the two parachutes to deploy at the same time while in descent. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

man in photo

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Alexander Fickas, an aerial delivery specialist assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, adjusts an M1 timer inside an M1 assembly used for aerial pallet drops, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The M1 assembly and timer allow the parachutes to be deployed when the platform is at a certain angle. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

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From the left, U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dylan Norton and Alexander Fickas, aerial delivery specialists assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, apply paper tape around the tubular nylon, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The “deadman” configuration is ensures proper parachute deployment after the platform leaves the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dylan Norton, an aerial delivery specialist assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, secures the cutter knife between two parachutes, Sept. 1, 2020, at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma. When the extraction parachute is deployed, it pulls the cutter knife cutting the type-V straps. (U.S. Air Force photo by StaffSgt. Cody Dowell)

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U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Dylan Norton, an aerial delivery specialist assigned to the 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron, performs the final rigger inspection on a heavy platform to ensure proper assembly. The inspection, the last step of assembling the platform, conducted by two members to ensure proper assembly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Cody Dowell)

ALTUS AIR FORCE BASE, Okla. --

The 97th Logistics Readiness Squadron Airmen play a crucial role in the primary training mission at Mobility’s Hometown. One such task is training qualified C-17 Globemaster III loadmasters to be certified in airdrop training.

Once an airdrop request has been made, the air operations flight of the 97th LRS has a shared responsibility to ensure airdrop pallets and cargo or “platform” are properly assembled for aircrew training. They accomplish several tasks from packing parachutes to loading the platform on the aircraft and everything in-between.

The air operations flight helps produce an average of 466 airdrop platforms for approximately 90 C-17 loadmasters training at Mobility’s Hometown annually.

 

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